I'm not the Immortal Artist. You are

Immortal Artist is dedicated to exploring all aspects of experimental art and creating new and innovative techniques which other artists can use to strengthen their own work.


The blogs creator, experimental artist Grey Cross pursues and discusses art across a wide spectrum of artistic mediums. They include painting, sculpting, body art, digital art, and photography. With an emphasis on teaching artists to utilize today's social networks to further their own art and reputations.


This blog uses the Living Blog concept, an idea created by Grey Cross

Grey Cross Studios/Immortal Artist Operations

New Orleans

Email: greyacross@aol.com

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Abstraction versus Purpose - Or How I Surprised Myself With My Own Art

This is a continuation of the discussion started in this post.

When I create a wall sculpture, I always look towards creating a piece of work that is both an abstraction and has a purpose. Usually during the process of creating the sculpture, the canvas is constantly moved from a flat position to a standing position, giving me the ability to see what the work looks like as it will hang on the wall.

The current sculpture was a bit different. I wanted the opportunity to position the various elements after most of them were created, so the canvas laid flat for the first 6 weeks while I built the individual components for it and then moved them around like pieces on a chessboard, until I had them exactly the way I wanted them.

So I never got a chance to watch the slow emergence of the abstraction. Until now, this has been my view of the work.


I've seen it in what I call its "purposeful" state throughout its development. Yesterday though I finally began to secure the individual components to the canvas. And tonight for the first time the canvas was lifted to its vertical position and I was finally able to see it in "abstract" state.


And as you can see, its a totally different piece of art. For once even I was able to see it with fresh eyes and was reminded of the reason I do things this way. I want the viewer to be confused at first look. I want the viewer to think "what the hell am I looking at?" I want them to be struck by the ridiculously complex abstraction. They can see the uniformity of it, but what precisely they are seeing is a mystery.

Then they take a step closer...


And they suddenly see that there is a wealth of detail that sort of makes sense. A few more steps and suddenly everything takes on a new meaning and the purpose snaps into existence. It is no longer lines and colors in a blur. The viewer has gone from abstraction to purpose in the blink of an eye and with a suddenness that I have actually seen cause a gasp in the viewer.

And tonight, for me, I got just that gasp, but it worked in the opposite direction. I knew the purpose but I could only grasp the abstraction in my head. I'd not actually seen it. And when I did I got a rare and very pleasant surprise

Yes, then the artist in me kicked in and I found a thousand little nit picky things wrong with the composition, but for that one moment I got to see my own art from the eyes of the viewer, not the artist.

I am not sure there is even a way to duplicate this experience again, but it proved to me that my theory on abstraction and purpose is a valid way to create my art. Sadly the photos in this blog do not even come close to giving you the remote viewer the same experience. Its something that has to occur directly in front of the art. But it can happen.

If you would like to discuss this art theory more, please feel free to respond to this blog entry or contact me directly at gcsartno@aol.com

If you would like more information on the sculpture I use for an example in this entry, please see the working notes for the project at:



Sunday, April 26, 2015

Mad Dr Frankenstein in the Dreaded House of Art

soul
[sohl] 

The principle of life, feeling, thought, and action in humans, regarded as a distinct entity separate from the body, and commonly held to be separable in existence from the body; the spiritual part of humans as distinct from the physical part.




It is always amazing to me when a piece of art takes on its own life. Since I've never done small pieces of art, I get to watch a slow progression that takes place over days, weeks and months. The piece of art remains inert and inanimate for a long time then one day it reaches a tipping point where the whole piece begins to breath.

There is an electric shock that runs through me at that moment. I feel like Dr Frankenstein. I want to shout "Its Alive!!!!" and laugh with insanity. But I restrain myself and keep my dignity (what little I have).

But for many artists I talk with, their work is truly alive. It is more than just paint on a canvas. It takes on a life of its own. And while it may not be a body of flesh, there is a soul contained within it.

So I wonder sometimes just how much of our own spirit we give over to our art. Is that life spark a part of us? Or is any piece of art just another object like an I-Phone or a hunk of cheese? There are definitely groups that believes both ways.

The verdict is still out for me. But when I look at a great work of art in a museum, I'd swear there is still a spark of the original creator within it. Anyone whose gazed at the Mona Lisa knows its not just the eyes that draw people, but something deeper. We don't like to talk about, so we blame it on the eyes. But its there.

I can't help but think that a piece of art where the artist spends months and sometimes years creating, does not in some way hold his/her original essence.

Its not quantifiable. A scientist couldn't read it. But still....

I suppose for some artists this is way to metaphysical. Its just a piece of canvas with paint on it! Or is it? If parents adopt a child and place all their love and caring into that child from the very beginning of its life, then that child in some way holds the spark of the spirit of mother and father. Why is it such a stretch to believe that we cannot transfer that spark to something that does not live and breath?

I have said before that art is an extension of who I am into a future where my physical self cannot go. So why is it so far fetched that part of the spark of life also goes on within that work?

The next time you visit a museum or a gallery, see what else you can sense in each piece you look at. In most you probably won't sense a thing, but I challenge you that there will be that one piece that stands out for you and speaks. Some say that as just the artists skills, but I would like to believe its something deeper, something that your kindred soul hears deep down inside and resonates with.

Then again I may just be some mad artist with a paintbrush and a wild imagination.

What are your thoughts?

Creatively,
~Grey~


Friday, April 24, 2015

THE SOOTHING PEACE - By Eman Elnezami



Immortal Artist seeks to give a venue for creatives to discuss and show specific pieces of their work. We want to give you a forum to talk about the history and development of specific pieces of art. If you would like more information please check out the following link.




Artist: Eman Elnezami
Location: Egypt
Work of Art: The Soothing Peace





The soothing Peace


Oil painting 12*16 inch on canvas.

A woman dressed in light blue standing centered in peace and calmness. You will find that the dress curves are in TUNE with that peace flowing and floating in an ethereal way. Her arms are wide open receiving the air, the LOVE and centering the world in her heart. The hair is reddish brown, not really styled but reflects the soothing effect of the whole painting .The background enhances that dreamy closed eyed feeling of peace and comfort. Of being in space with warmth and inner joy.

What is really standing out is that humbled ghost beside her. It is bowing, bending to her shaking her left hand with a nearly smiling ghostly face. The ghost was tamed by her inner peace and beauty. it is taller than her but bowing. It is evacuated from its dark contents turning into something more peaceful. Every little feature is inspiring for everyone to live and be in that space. 

I painted this after I saw a woman in that feeling reflecting on herself while giving love to other people around her. Of course these are not her features yet it is exactly her state of being. She chose to tame evil through peace. 

What would you choose?    

+++

The artist has created a special audio to accompany this description. You can listen to it here:



You can view this and other works by the artist at: http://www.artpal.com/emynezamy

You can reach Eman through the following:

Twitter: @emynezamy
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Eman-Elnezami/1555001101446954
Soundcloud: Eman Ali

Eman Elnezami

I am a physician, who started using oil painting as my own tool to release stress and HEAL my own inner soul . I believe the emotional art is a bridge between your inner-self and outer appearance. I used them as following; put intention into a painting everyday like motivation and dive into some part for ex the eyes, I see something that motivates me forward.Whatever intention you put, you get . Also being in contact with different people every single day made me carry emotions that are not mine and I needed a channel to get them through, exciting thing happened, every single one of them contains mixed amount of emotions so you will find at least one emotion that you will feel. I paint interactions between people as well, woman and her child, coworkers, friends .These are similar to everyday interactions. Something in common in all my work. You will feel something! I use oil on canvas in all my work. I fell in love with the similarity between emotions of human kind, it is all the same! Instead of feeling the pain inside I strongly believe that you can get them up in front of you seeing, acknowledging and releasing them . Take as much time as you would like in front of them.




Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Expectation & Legacy - When You Expected Your Art to Shit Rainbows and Pots of Gold

legacy
[leg-uh-see] 

Anything handed down from the past, as from an ancestor or predecessor


Every new artist experiences the same thing. That overwhelming sense of satisfaction the first time you make something and everyone around you says Wow, that's awesome! And right from the start you've been given a false expectation of your own work.

We've all thought, "damn I can sell this!" And you just might sell that first or second piece, usually to family or a close friend. And you think "damn that was easy! I'll make another". but then things start to change. That one didn't sell as easily or maybe not at all. "But wait!" you say to yourself "I'm a great artist" and that expectation drops down another notch.

The problem is, as the art begins piling up around you and gathers dust, your expectation level drops to the sub-basement. Its here where many just give up and go back to their day jobs. And its here that you should do exactly the opposite because in this place your no longer living a fantasy. Your about to start down the trail of a true and serious artist. If you let yourself do so. Most don't.

You enter an exclusive class now, where you realize the art is more important than the money. The joy of the creation outweighs the fact that you are filling up every room in your house with those creations.

As I said, most fail at this point. Its too hard to learn how to market yourself while learning how to truly be a professional artist. That's a dilemma a lot of us face. I wish I could say it gets easier as time goes by, but for many it doesn't. Many of us fight for our artistic existence every single day.

Like any thing worth doing though, you must bear the slings and arrows of growing your art. And with it your reputation as an artist. Its terribly hard to do both of these and keep them in balance. If you pass the first hurdle of taking your work seriously, then you will rush headlong towards the next hurdle which is the day when you are faced with taking the easy road and creating the same thing over and over again for your life as an artist because you found a niche where one particular type of thing sells over and over again.

In some ways I think this is a scarier hurdle than the first one is because you know you have a good thing. Painting that beach scene over and over again rakes you in that easy $200 per painting. Knitting those cat booties and selling them for a quick $80 is grand!

Here again your faced with expectations. But this one is different. This one makes you money and that is a great thing, but what are you giving up in exchange for it? Eventually your ability to learn new things comes to a slow halt because you've turned your art into a xerox machine (wow dating myself there, at least I didn't say a ditto machine).

Yes I can hear you arguing, isn't that the point of art to sell it and make money from it??? But I'm an idealist. I think that it halts the creative process in its path. Eventually you grow bored and your skills get stale. Your not progressing as an artist.

This is where the talent pool winnows down again. We lost some of you right at the start, we lose a whole lot more of you here in the middle. So where do I go from here? I can be an artist and make money now. But remember those two things I mentioned earlier, skills and reputation. To be a master artisan you must constantly keep those two things in balance with each other. Anything that throws those off will just mean your another crafts-person.

Now for some, many actually, that's OK. You've got a good thing going and I can't say I blame you for wanting to just stay at this plateau. Your creating stuff and your getting paid for it. This is indeed enough for a lot of folk and I can't blame them. In fact I am sort of envious. This is the stage in an artists career where you can really make your name. Look at Thomas Kinkade. His art was beautiful and worth thousands. But I'm sorry, every painting I ever saw the man do pretty much looked like every other one. He found his niche and he actively pursued turning it into a money maker for himself. But I honestly have to say I don't think very highly of the man. He was what he was I suppose and madly successful, but I do NOT consider him a Master Artist.

So what makes the master artist? There isn't a a formula (and no I'm not claiming to be one either). But I can see some trends that make a true master. The Master Artist never ever stops developing their skills. Geeze look at Picasso. The man made every kind of art possible. Heck I even have a set of plates that are replicas that he made. Plates! He was never afraid to try something different. How many of us can say the same?

Look at Michelangelo. The man created David AND the Sistine Chapel. What the hell do either of those have to do with each other? But that is the point isn't it? The only connection is that the man could do both because he allowed his skill level to get to that point. You don't do that by stopping and stagnating. And with that level of skill came a reputation that could not be matched.

Please don't get reputation confused with popularity. Both Picasso and Michelangelo were popular, but popularity doesn't always reflect skill.

In the Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia in the southern Italian city of Reggio Calabria, Italy are the Riace Bronze sculptures. These were found buried in the sand off the coast of Italy. They are considered some of the most perfect statues every created. The artist is unknown, but his reputation goes on because of these amazing statues. I say again "Skills and Reputation are not popularity".

I suppose if there is a point to this, its to not allow life in any form, stop you from developing your skills to the highest level possible and eventually becoming that Master Artist. It won't happen right away and you probably won't even realize it happened at all. But the natural evolution of the artist is a slow and steady path. Don't get knocked off it or at least don't fool yourself into thinking your something your not.

Always approach your art with a warriors spirit and a saints heart.

Creatively,
~Grey~

Monday, April 20, 2015

A Not So Typical Day in My Studio

routine
[roo-teen] 

A customary or regular course of procedure.

Commonplace tasks, chores, or duties as must be done regularly or at specified intervals; typical or everyday activity:


I was asked recently to describe a typical day in the studio. Its a simple enough question, but it got me to thinking what habits I have and what habits other artists might have.

I think I might be on the extreme side of what "typical" means. For me no day is typical, yet each shares a certain routine that I try (sometimes very unsuccessfully to stick to.

Let me preface the following account with the fact that I am a multi-tasker. No, not just a multi-tasker, more like a multi-tasker on crack! I pretty much do about 50 different things all at once. It is not unusual for me to be holding multiple conversations online while at the same time creating my art. I've honed multi-tasking into a science. So multiply everything I will say by ten.

I suppose the most important thing to say right up front is that "a day" for me is often 12-18 hours long. I don't sleep normally. For me the day starts around One in the afternoon. I am not one to usually lay around sleepily. Once I am awake the day starts by going through my email before I even get out of bed. I like to know what I missed during my sleep. I am usually up quickly after that and ravenous. The first meal of the day (which I can't with good conscientious call breakfast) is taken in front of the computer and thus begins the day.

The afternoon is errand and catch up time. Very little actual art occurs but a lot of setting the stage for later happens. I may write for the blog, review artists portfolios or comment and critic students work. This is also the time for those stupid nagging life chores like running to the store and cleaning the studio. Also as a side note I am a maniac for keeping up on the world. I have news feeds that come in constantly on a wide variety of subjects which I follow closely. A good portion of the afternoon is left to finding out whats going on around the world.

If all goes well by 5pm I've wrapped up and focusing for awhile on the social networks. I review and prepare for my Artist of the Day program and take perhaps a half hour or so off to relax.

At 7pm I try to promptly post the Artist of the Day on Twitter and my favorite song of the day post. I start to consider the nights art at this time also. I've already decided pretty much on what I want to accomplish (thats done just before the end of each day). So I look through and make sure I have everything I need for whatever project phase I am in. This changes so often. At the time of this writing I am still building crypts and tombs for a cemetery piece. This may last for weeks or months before I totally shift to a new sculpture and with it the paradigm of the studio also shifts.

So finally 9pm approaches and for me the night is just getting going. At 9pm everything halts for about an hour. This is dinner time and pill taking time and about the only solid regimental thing in my daily life. Everything else has a bit of flexibility except for this hour of the night.

By 10pm the art begins. Now its important to emphasize the phase of art I am currently in. This phase began about 8 months ago and continues until I am ready to go to different type of art. My sculptures are composed of many smaller sculptures. For example a piece completed several months ago has 84 individual components on it, each which took anywhere from 1-5 days to complete. Once the individual component is finished its then added to the whole. In the case of the current sculpture, each individual component is a crypt, tomb or mausoleum. Its planned, crafted and added to the larger canvas. As of tonight there are 21 individual components completed with probably that many more to be done.



So the night is a microcosm of the larger piece of art. The parts are compiled from my stock room, color schemes are chosen and the actual crafting of the piece begins. If I am lucky I complete the individual component that same night, but in most cases it may be a two or even three day process.

This goes on until 12:30am in which the second mandatory stop of the day occurs. We call this the...uhh...ummm "Family Guy break". It is in fact the only time where the television actually is turned on. Yes, the only thing that stops the art in this household is Seth McFarlane's sense of humor. An addiction my partner and I can't seem to break.


But as they say its the pause the refreshes.

From 1am on until at least 5-6am is pretty much all studio time. There may be a few small breaks and a snack or two, but that is the prime time for creating. By 5am we are usually ready to wrap it up. I often conclude the night with a final image of the complete sculpture to post online. It not only gives followers a chance to see what was accomplished, but gives me the opportunity to look over what I've gotten done.

The last phase of the night concludes with a brainstorming session where decisions are made on what I will want to accomplish the following day. This gives me the opportunity to make sure I have everything I need supply wise in advance.

Needed supplies change the end of the night a bit. If things are needed, 6am is usually the time to do it. Home Depot and Walmart open at 6am and the art store by 8am, so at least 2 or 3 times a week those last hours are art supply runs.

If we are lucky we are asleep by 9am and the whole cycle begins again. Late to bed days may mean sleeping an hour or so later into the afternoon.

There are of course a thousand small variations to this routine. But those are exceptions to the rule, not the norm. The nice thing about our schedule is we can also blow it off when we want to. There is no pressure of a 9-5 job routine or requesting days off for vacation. We work hard and we produce, but we are not slaves to someone elses job and that makes a huge difference in our moral and how much we are able to produce.

I can absolutely say that most days are a joy and far too short for everything I'd like to get accomplished.

I'd like to hear about your typical studio art days. I know that for many, the novelty of being able to devote all their time to their art is a rare thing. But what are your habits? Do you have to psych yourself up first to create or do you just jump right into it? How long is your typical session? Tell me about it and email it to me at gcsartno@aol.com and I'll put it up in the blog for others to read. Lets hear your stories!

Creatively
~Grey~

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Depression and the Artist

depression
[dih-presh-uh n] 

A condition of general emotional dejection and withdrawal; sadness greater and more prolonged than that warranted by any objective reason.

We set ourselves upon a pyre of our own despair to burn


Depression for anyone is a fierce battle between sanity and insanity. Its an experience that I would wish on no one.

I watched my mother struggle with it her whole life. It was so bad that not once but on several different occasions I was forced (after I was an adult of course) to have her temporarily committed so we could keep her from killing herself. It was a constant battle and one that for much of her life was controlled by badly prescribed drugs that made her situation worse. But even in more recent years when the drug quality was much better, getting her to stay on them was a battle.

She tried everything to control it. She fell back on religion more times than I can possibly count. She read self help books. She joined cults. But nothing worked. She was a very intelligent woman. She knew what was happening to her and often her guilt at her actions after recovery would just kick her back into it.

It wasn't until she was in her elder years that she found a solution. She rediscovered her creativity. She began making art. This little old Grandma Moses stereotype had found that while she was painting, the depression slipped away.

I'd always known that art had healing effects on both the mind and body, but until that time I'd never really seen it in action. She worked round the clock and while her health degraded quickly in those last years she painted until the last possible moment. And she gave it all away. It was never about profit for her. It was about healing the mind.

I have used her as an example to people who have suffered with depression over and over again. And I began to keep my eyes open on how other artists managed their own illness. Even more importantly, I watched how I managed it in myself.

I am my mothers son and while I never had the severe mood swings and constant suicidal episodes which she faced, I still had my fair share of problems. In my previous creative incarnations as a writer and then professional photographer, I never found the cure to my depressive moods. It wasn't until I decided to abandon everything I had previously done and with no lick of skill at all, jumped fully into being a professional artist. And you know, it worked. In 5+ years I've not had one seriously manic episode that lasted more than a few hours.

Don't get me wrong, the depression was still there. But I found that when that mood shift began and things looked terribly dark, if I forced myself physically kicking and screaming into the studio that the moods would ebb away. It wasn't easy. I'd spend the first hour positive that everything I was making was pure crap. But if I ignored that part and just created for the sake of creating, I would eventually find myself making less crap and feeling pretty good again.

Now I want to preface this with a need to understand that some people due to their body chemistry absolutely NEED to also be on prescription medications. Art doesn't erase body chemistry. But it sure can help with easing the passage.

My partner is a good example of this. His depression needs the care of drugs also. But I can see the difference in him if I can get him into his work space. He immediately perks up and refocuses his moods on what he is doing.

We have a friend who takes several prescription drugs for severe depression, but periodically decides they are not going to take them anymore and plummets immediately into the abyss once off them. No amount of creativity is going to fix that.

I take daily medications for my HIV. I will be on them all my life. It would not be logical for me to suddenly say "I'm tired of these drugs. I'm done with them." Simply put, I'd die. Just because a drug is controlling depression, does NOT mean its any less vital to your life.

So what does this mean for the artist? It means that your art is more than just play time with the paints. For many of us there are vital consequences for discontinuing the work we do. I believe there are more depressive artists out there than we know. I often have artists tell me how they were so miserable in their previous work environments. They found a whole new world when they began creating. I also see a lot of people who deal with depression but never found the creative part of their spirits. They think its just a waste of time to make anything. Why bother?

But it is important and it can be the pivot that keeps us sane, productive and happy.

So like drugs, we sometimes have to create a routine around our creativity. With routine, we force ourselves into a schedule. Routines are easier to follow than random stops into the studio when we are feeling low. If you suffer from depression, then make yourself a routine. Don't focus so much on "what" you create. Make your focus on just doing it. Put aside issues of quality, originality or lack of skills. None of those things are important for this. Its the raw act of creation that is crucial and which changes moods.

A lot of people say "I can't create anything. I have no skills". With any other aspect of art I would say that skill is super important. Its not for this. You don't have to be a connoisseur of fine foods in order to eat a hamburger. But you will die if you eat nothing at all. If nothing else, grab a tube of paint and stick your thumb in it and finger paint. I am sure there are studies done of the release of chemicals to the brain when we create, although I admit its not my area of expertise. But creativity IS my area of expertise. And I tell you as a depressive and an artist that creating can and will change your body chemistry. But only if you force yourself to try it.


Grey Cross is not a paid psychologist. He's just some dude that shares his life and artistic experiences and hopes you'll gain something from it. 




Immortality Redux (or that odd artist guy that talks to the future)



Sometimes I feel like Philip K Dick without being able to fall back on drugs or schizophrenia for my craziness. But sometimes I am just unable to stop thinking.

Last month when I wrote the first article in this series, I began doing something rather odd. Totally at random I started tweeting to the future. Its not obvious. I'm not saying "dear future self". I am merely sending out some random thoughts that those in the present will look at and think "what the fuck?!" But that is because they are not meant for "now". They are meant for the future and will only make sense once other things that I've placed in both my art and my writing come to light.

I know I can hear you now "the dumb-ass has delusions of grandeur. Like anyone's going to care what he has to say". But if you followed my theories on immortality within the social networks, then its not that far fetched that someone will run across these things 100, 500 or 1,000 years from now.

I honestly find it a fascinating brain puzzle which may lead nowhere, but intrigues me enough to be placing these messages to the future like randomly dialing phone numbers  to see who (if anyone) might answer.

Come on now. Doesn't the idea fascinate you just a bit? What would you say? What is the most important things you want your immortal self to contain? This is your chance.

The simple fact is, that unless you plan to write your own autobiography, its these bits and pieces that will form the picture of who you were. I for one plan to spice mine up with enough curiosities to really give them a run for their money.

I recently wrote that Photographers sometimes don't realize at the time an image is snapped how momentous that image might be years later. We can kind of grasp that. There are photos I took pre Hurricane Katrina of places that no longer exist. Do you think I thought about that at the time I shot them? No, I definitely did not. But you know, I should have. I should have had the foresight to think that everything I do may have consequences up the timeline.

I tend to think that if we all considered our lives in this way, the world may turn into a very different place. But as I said before, we ARE the first generation to be immortal and we might take us time to get it right. But we'd better start acting responsibly or there won't be anyone up the timeline to find us.

We are so locked into the "now" that we have totally forgotten about the future. Let it take care of itself. We pay it lip service by "claiming" that what we do is for our children and grandchildren but that's just bull-crap. We are thinking about ourselves, our own needs, our own cynicism of the world around us and our own bitterness that things aren't going the way we believe they should be going.

But the first generation of immortals "must" start thinking differently. If we don't change our perspectives and see our world with fresh eyes then the legacy left to the first generation will be destroyed.

For me I shall continue to babble away to the future and if you run across a random message from me that makes absolutely no sense, don't trouble over it. Its not addressed to you anyway.

Creatively,
~Grey~

This series WILL be continued



Saturday, April 11, 2015

DIVE INTO LOVE - By Eman Elnezami



Immortal Artist seeks to give a venue for creatives to discuss and show specific pieces of their work. We want to give you a forum to talk about the history and development of specific pieces of art. If you would like more information please check out the following link.




Artist: Eman Elnezami
Location: Egypt
Work of Art: Dive Into Love





This is an oil painting , real size is 12" x 16"

I painted it after I captured really messy and mixed emotions from people . When you look into the eyes, it is a very different space. I had a friend who cried and felt like she wanted to hold onto the tree to survive. Her lips are vivid, the muddy color on her cheeks where things are not clear. the intelligence in her eyes and them looking to the infinity relying on the knowing that she is capable of handling anything she is going through. The darkness in her neck is formed into a tree root that you can grab and ascend .There is an inside laughter, INNER JOY,  a party ready to come out at any time in her lips as if she WANTS to feel better.

What if you can see into her eyes can resonate with something inside you? What if you set an intention to look at this painting everyday? What is it is saying something you need this day? Dive into it and notice, it is full of colors gouache is used beneath her forehead in violet warm way and in the extreme right corner as well. While you tap into the eyes you can see a beam of light, INTELLIGENCE and golden points of light in them . There are these two blue lines that run down her cheek, her state is far from sadness. I am seeing them as tears running beneath this apparently QUIET face. This is a GIANT  tree of a woman. HER hair is the leaves and the stem is her neck but you decide what it is representing!

The little mud beneath her eye tells a story of previous scar or previous pain. Her life VIBRANT red cheeks and lips are like a clown face, this could be a falsified attempt by her to understand beauty! Her branches continue beyond in the background. She continues to choose herself as a tree, BRANCHED , ROUGH, CHAOTIC , WITH BIG BLUE EARRINGS, what would you choose ?


You can view this and other works by the artist at: http://www.artpal.com/emynezamy

You can reach Eman through the following:

Twitter: @emynezamy
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Eman-Elnezami/1555001101446954
Soundcloud: Eman Ali

Eman Elnezami

I am a physician, who started using oil painting as my own tool to release stress and HEAL my own inner soul . I believe the emotional art is a bridge between your inner-self and outer appearance. I used them as following; put intention into a painting everyday like motivation and dive into some part for ex the eyes, I see something that motivates me forward.Whatever intention you put, you get . Also being in contact with different people every single day made me carry emotions that are not mine and I needed a channel to get them through, exciting thing happened, every single one of them contains mixed amount of emotions so you will find at least one emotion that you will feel. I paint interactions between people as well, woman and her child, coworkers, friends .These are similar to everyday interactions. Something in common in all my work. You will feel something! I use oil on canvas in all my work. I fell in love with the similarity between emotions of human kind, it is all the same! Instead of feeling the pain inside I strongly believe that you can get them up in front of you seeing, acknowledging and releasing them . Take as much time as you would like in front of them.





Friday, April 10, 2015

Dwelling on the Future - An Artists Perspective



I recently drove past the street that I lived on when I first came to New Orleans 13 years ago. At that time I had just concluded 10 years of wandering the country by car, crisscrossing it from one coast to the other in an attempt to find myself. I was successful and came away with a much better understanding of who I was and what I needed to do with my life from that point on.

I came to New Orleans soon after with a firm resolve to become a writer. I moved in with friends in a ramshackle apartment and lived the bohemian lifestyle while dedicating myself to finishing my first book. The apartment was on the second floor and the bathroom was an extension off one side that was literally held up by stilts and slanted slightly to one side. We were absolutely sure it would go tumbling to the ground someday (btw its still standing somehow). And I was kind of miserable. Before it got better, it got worse when Hurricane Katrina came knocking, but that is a story for another day.

Monday, April 6, 2015

SCARED OF FEAR - By Artist Eman Elnezami



Immortal Artist seeks to give a venue for creatives to discuss and show specific pieces of their work. We want to give you a forum to talk about the history and development of specific pieces of art. If you would like more information please check out the following link.




Artist: Eman Elnezami
Location: Egypt
Work of Art: Scared of Fear



This is an oil painting on canvas 12*16 inch. It is a woman symbolizing fear that i see in SO many people . She is afraid and trying to threat others as well. She is not innocent ,her bloody teeth do not only convey her own threat exuded but her nasty side inside . She is afraid while she is scary herself .

That is the ironic part in it . The darkness inside her exuded the bloody darkness around . She is exhausted but not in despair. The emotion that can come up for you is fear that could reside inside you or a bit of insecurity. Look into her, especially if you are a woman who had any kind of trauma in your life . SEE into it and free yourself from my own story and let your inner emotions tell you what is going on ! Create your own story too!
.
This a continuation of a theme I started about :women. The background is black and red , the perfect combination for anger . She is Angry . Her hair is curly in black , yellow, purple, pink , orange, with a strange furious haircut. Her hair is angry too! Her mouth is open. She wants to defend, resist, she is scared . The two bloody teeth coming out from the sides of her mouth are threatening , vividly red extending to the edge of the canvas. She is infinitely dangerous and infinitely long. When she is afraid her defense mechanism is to be more dangerous (even if she is really not ). Her shoulders are bare with black shadows, they are bare to show that her fear is naked , she is not hiding her fears no matter how hard she tries. Her skin is earthy. The fingers beneath her right eye symbolize her fear. You will not see the rest of the hand because it is not there! Fingers stretching her right eye. Maybe she is scared of something in the infinity that neither you or I can see. Would you give her an excuse for being so scary ? What are you seeing?

You can view this and other works by the artist at: http://www.artpal.com/emynezamy

You can reach Eman through the following:

Twitter: @emynezamy
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Eman-Elnezami/1555001101446954
Soundcloud: Eman Ali

Eman Elnezami

I am a physician, who started using oil painting as my own tool to release stress and HEAL my own inner soul . I believe the emotional art is a bridge between your inner-self and outer appearance. I used them as following; put intention into a painting everyday like motivation and dive into some part for ex the eyes, I see something that motivates me forward.Whatever intention you put, you get . Also being in contact with different people every single day made me carry emotions that are not mine and I needed a channel to get them through, exciting thing happened, every single one of them contains mixed amount of emotions so you will find at least one emotion that you will feel. I paint interactions between people as well, woman and her child, coworkers, friends .These are similar to everyday interactions. Something in common in all my work. You will feel something! I use oil on canvas in all my work. I fell in love with the similarity between emotions of human kind, it is all the same! Instead of feeling the pain inside I strongly believe that you can get them up in front of you seeing, acknowledging and releasing them . Take as much time as you would like in front of them.




Sunday, April 5, 2015

Of Tired Spirits Far From Rest -Easter Morning in the City of the Dead



Last Easter Sunday, with camera in hand we headed out at 4:30am to meet the dead.

While a majority of the Christian world were heading to their local church to celebrate a man raising from the dead, we preferred to keep company with those less fortunate, the ones still in the grave.

Hidden in every major city is a place where the poverty stricken go to be interred. Its often hidden from sight, in some out of the way place. Some give it a name, others just call it Potters Field.

John Doe is buried Here. So is the man you passed every day on the street corner who'd lost his legs long ago and holds out a ragged sign for help. Doubtful you even realized he wasn't on that corner anymore. The woman you almost hit one night who came shambling out of an alleyway, her arms covered with needle marks, her face gaunt and ghostly. That lost looking little old lady who lived in poverty across the street for years, who one day left in an ambulance and never came back. Her few belongings ending up out in front of the tiny place she called home. Homeless children, who never had a chance to grow and thrive.



That is the nature of this place. It is neither friendly or welcoming. There is no dignity, no ornate tombs, no flowers brought monthly to remember the dead.

It is merely a refuse heap where those without are dropped off and forgotten about. And here we chose to spend Easter morning before the sun even touched the sky.



Despite the disquiet of the dead passing, there is a quiet peace here. It is neither frightening or repulsive. Huge live oaks weeping Spanish moss watch silently over the place. They are the guardians. In the early spring it is marshy, with small streams passing near the graves.



But then the water fades away leaving only sunken paths where it once was. And it is replaced with brief beauty as wild flowers burst forth, carpeting the landscape for a few short weeks and making it almost faerie like in its appearance.



Then spring gives way to the heat of a southern summer and bakes the ground to hard clay where only the insects care to wander. And still the live oaks keep watch.

We've wandered here before. Only once during the heat of a summers day where we labored for breath and the ground snarled almost as if they were about to spit out the dead as if they were a sour taste in its mouth. It was neither peaceful or welcoming that first time. After that we took to the night and visited only while the darkness wrapped around us.

The gate is never locked. Why bother? Not even the homeless want to visit here. It is too much of a reminder of what awaits them. The temptation is too great to just lay down under the oaks and go to sleep for good.

In the center of the this place sits a massive oak. Its branches so heavy that its laid down with the dead and covered the meager graves with its vast arms, protectively.


It may be ancient, but it is very awake. It knows everything that goes on in this place. It is aware but not angry. It would prefer to be alone with the dead, but occasionally it seeks the companionship of the living also. Beneath its branches are the shattered remains of graves and the occasional marker stone. They huddle beneath its arms.


There is an other worldliness to this place. You cannot see the dead. There are not spirits hanging in the air or eerie noises almost beyond the range of hearing. But there is something. You cross a border into someplace else when you enter here and there is a momentary concern that you might be unable to cross back again.

There is evidence that others have been here too. Some graves have mementos left by the living. Some have hand scrawled signs made with spray paint and plywood with the names of the dead upon them. There are the bits and pieces of shattered statues set to guard the dead but ending up buried and lost with them


And there are the signs of the practitioners. The voodoo users, rootmen and spell casters who use this place to strengthening their work. Evidence of them is all around in the form of half burnt vigil candles and oddly placed items such as pairs of shoes and rotting eggplants that seem to have no earthly reason for why they should be there.

Yes, others have been here and others will come. The tree knows. Some it doesn't care for. The ones who lay dark and evil spells at the base of its roots. Some it welcomes. The ones that come to help others. The ones with good hearts and strong skills that they use to give aide to those in need. These are always welcome.

And even when the sun finally rises to each new day, the other-worldliness may fade, but it still remains. And when the sun again sinks, it will cast its gates open again to whatever awaits it in the night.

As the sun finally rose on this Easter morning, we were better people for having shared this night with the dead and we leave it in peace until our next visit.

******