I'm not the Immortal Artist. You are

Immortal Artist is dedicated to exploring all aspects of experimental art and creating new and innovative techniques which other artists can use to strengthen their own work.


The blogs creator, experimental artist Grey Cross pursues and discusses art across a wide spectrum of artistic mediums. They include painting, sculpting, body art, digital art, and photography. With an emphasis on teaching artists to utilize today's social networks to further their own art and reputations.


This blog uses the Living Blog concept, an idea created by Grey Cross

Grey Cross Studios/Immortal Artist Operations

New Orleans

Email: greyacross@aol.com

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Balancing Act - Using Foaming Glue in Art

In the kind of sculpture I work with, glue is of vital importance. I talk a lot about using foaming glue. The "Solitude" piece is a good example of foaming glue in action. Each piece in the sculpture has to be laid in individually. It has to be balanced precisely where I want it and then a mechanism found that keeps that piece in place and position until the foaming glue at its base dries.

The tricky part is that once its placed and the glue is added, then there is a tiptoe walk that commences in the studio until the glue is firm enough to hold the piece on its own. This usually entails about 20 minutes of gently closing doors and mincing around the room to avoid vibrations that may knock it over. Its a house of cards until the glue sets. None of the 15+ pieces on the sculpture could be laid together. All of them had to be set separately and left to dry. 





But the miracle of foaming glue is that it sets rock solid and it expands up the base of each piece. If you've not used foaming glue before, make sure you use rubber gloves when experimenting. The stuff doesn't react well to human skin. Watch for drips that may settle on clothing or skin. Wipe it away quickly or else the pants your wearing may be part of you for a long time to come.

When experimenting, take time to watch the phases that the glue goes through to reach its final hardened stage. Each phase allows for different things to occur. You can texture the glue if you catch it at the right phase. I use a chopstick and a few other select tools to craft in texture. But if its done too soon the glue will just move back into place over the areas you worked on. If done too late the glue will already be too hard to make many changes. I usually say about ten minutes into the process is a good time to start adding texture. 

Watch the way the glue drips. Take advantage of the drips to create controlled designs and wipe away excess drips early to avoid foaming up. 

This is an amazing substance if its used right and creatively and you an paint over it without any difficulties. Please leave your questions or comments below and I will be happy to answer them.

Creatively,
~Grey~

No comments:

Post a Comment