Friday, April 16, 2021

The Imaginarium Gallery Presents D.C. Destruction Complete (There is no Saving a World Which is Bent on Destroying Itself)

 


The Imaginarium Gallery Presents Structural Chaos #1 - The Merging of Geometry & Abstraction

 


What is Structural Chaos?


Structural Chaos is uniformity and anarchy existing togetherIt is the bringing together of two dynamically opposed forms into a single piece of art. 

Geometry is about straight and bisecting lines, sharp demarcations of color. Shapes mathematic in their design. 

In opposition, abstract art is about a total lack of geometry where the paint, through its complete lack of form, creates random shapes and impressions that allows the eye to draw images within the chaos. 

The key to Structural Chaos is to work in multiple dimensions. There are artists that utilize both geometry and abstraction within their work, but rarely is it translated into multiple dimensions. Using only one dimension causes the geometry to often get lost within the abstraction. It overwhelms the opposing aspect that is so crucial to structural chaos. 

geometry by its very nature is 3 dimensional. You can portray a box as a 3 dimensional object much more effectively than you can by just drawing it.

To some artists structural chaos will not be anything new. They take it for granted when they create their art. But I feel that understanding the definition of what you are doing helps you to clarify the process and bring out both aspects more clearly. 

The Imaginarium Gallery Presents Past & Future Merging (The Printmakers Art)

 


The art of the 18th century, through the printmakers art, allowed people for the first time to experience a view of the rest of the world. While cameras were still being developed, the printmaker could etch a scene of magic and wonder. 

This original print was found mangled at an estate sale and rescued. Once cleaned up and scanned, it now becomes a new piece of art as we employ the skills of a digital artist and a surrealist to re-envision this original scene of the Seine River, Notre Dame, Montmartre and what will eventually become the Louvre museum

Thursday, April 15, 2021

The Imaginarium Gallery Presents Variations on a Theme #1

 


 Variations is a digital art experiment. We use a single digital image taken from various other projects and create as many finished variations of the original as is possible. This is a test of the creative process. How long can we create variations that stand alone as their own individual piece of art before the creative process run out of steam. 

This is a test of establishing where we run out of ideas and when. How far we can go before the art begins to fail and repetition begins. 

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Labyrinth Project Creators Journal - Richard Alan Scott (New Entry 04/08/21)



Author: Richard Alan Scott
Rhode Island, USA



04/08/21

The thoughts I'm simmering and wrestling with tonight could happen after reading or viewing any biography, but I just happened to catch Ken Burns' 5-1/2 hour Documentary on Ernest Hemingway the past few nights, on PBS. We all know the celebrated writer of the Twentieth Century who revolutionized the form and lived as a larger than life caricature of himself, the lord of machismo; hunting, fishing, fighting wars and barroom loudmouths when he wasn't marrying the newest young correspondent to pique his attention.

As with any person successful in one's vocation, it is hard not to compare and challenge oneself, but some of the things I share with him surprised me, as I previously had only a passing knowledge of his writing. We both use short, choppy sentences and go for an economy of words. We both hope to be accepted by the high brow but mainly also wish to reach the low brow. (He said he aimed for readability by anyone with a high school education). We both had harsh Fathers, though he despised his Mom and I adored mine.

As I've grown older and am unsure how much time I have ahead of me, I do find it astonishing that I was able to overcome thought patterns I see in others I admire. Not to boast or think I am stronger than the individual, but I've come to certain conclusions I work very hard to maintain. I have largely been able to change reoccurring and nearly obsessive behaviors that are undoubtedly destructive to me, especially concerning eating and drinking, and raising hell. Yes I've had to adapt a more austere and modest lifestyle and avoid the habits that can bring forth the beast in me. I've had to adapt a more disciplined economy of stress, drama, and wasted movement that had caused numerous bad days in my past.

This includes ways of mind as well as body. I've managed to keep my loving relationship for nearly fifty years without too much altering of who I basically am. I have managed to keep depression, what Hemingway called "the black ass" away through greater control over my negative thoughts. Churchill called it "the black dog" and I can't help but be moved by the song from singer/ guitarist/ songwriter Nick Drake, dead at 21 in 1971 from an overdose ♫ Old black dog he called at my door, old black dog he called for more, an old black dog he knew my name, old black dog he knew my name.♫ I am able to recognize when I am moving toward going down the rabbit hole and veer my thought patterns, or at least recognize when I am due that kind of grief and allow myself to have it.

I try largely not to confront others as I would not want to be confronted. I've moved past many stumbling blocks in raising a child where I saw my father, and many parents, almost seek out the arguments and judgmental-ism that can cause an irreparable rift between parent and child that remains between them for years. I saw a lot of drinking and arguing as a child; I catch myself before anything I might say to a family member may do harm. I've seen the price and it is never, ever worth it. I saw my father cause a great deal of hurt and awkwardness in my family; under the guise of tough love he always had wanted to show you that he had an analysis of your behavior nailed, and you never knew when or where he may turn on you like a wombat and give you both barrels.

I know, I mix my metaphors like a Mofo, but you get the drift. Hemingway never forgave his father committing suicide and thought the man an utter coward for what he did to those left behind. That alone should have been enough to keep him from self-harm. Yet he never reconciled that disgust with the willingness to press the shotgun to his own brow. 

I work hard to eliminate the wrongs I've seen in my past and the wrongs those I admire did to themselves, their families, or what they had done to them. I don't imply any of this is easy. It's not easy, it's very fucking hard. One wants to always 'go off' on all offenders, but the offenders? Sorry but they are us.

If we don't learn and adjust our behavior, what are we here for? If we don't ply our art to put a spotlight on wrong thinking or try to heal through example, what are we plying for?
Next time: The Old Man and the Sea.



Monday, April 5, 2021

Labyrinth Creators Journal - JM Rosenberry (Updated 04/05/21)


Author: JM Rosenberry
Fargo, North Dakota 



04/05/20

Happy Easter! 

     I know I have been very absent from blogging but I really didn't feel up to posting.  I had a lot of negative feelings and stuff has been rather hard for everyone.  I didn't want to bring anyone down and have spent most of my time wrangling a brand new puppy.  I wasn't sure I even wanted another dog, but we ended up with a derpy Yellow lab named Gus.  He has been keeping me really busy and when I am not dog and kid wrangling I am trying to get back that lost hour of sleep.  Sleep has been good to me of late so why fight it right?  I am overworked, overstressed and ready to pull out my hair.  Then last week Jax got sick and I soon followed.  Taken down by a very nasty stomach bug.  It's left me weak and unable to eat, although I made hubby get me Taco Bell last night.   I have also been dealing with anxiety and work issues.  They made me go in even though I was a risk to everyone. 

So that's what I have been dealing with and right now I just want to feel better.  I tested negative for Covid so I guess that's good. This is a short blog to say that I am alive.  I spend a lot of time watching Discovery+  and now that it's warmer out maybe I will be able to get outside and go walking along the river.  I can't seem to do a whole lot without getting really winded and I hate that.  Whatever this is it's kicking my butt. So Happy Easter to those that celebrate it.  I'm going back to bed.  

Always 

JMR

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

What is Metatransient Art?


What is Metatransient Art?

Metatransience is art that intentionally changes over time. All things change.

Even though the artist may conclude that any given piece of art is finished, the truth is that they have assigned an arbitrary ending to it. All art whether it is being worked on or just looked at, is in a state of either evolution or devolution. 

The lifetime of a piece of art is constantly evolving when the artist is working on it and devolving after the artists concludes its finished.

Even art in extreme preservation such as DaVinci's Mona Lisa or Michelangelo's David are still subject to the laws of nature and are slowly devolving as they age. 

Metatranscience means that the artist is consciously changing the art. A perfect example of metatranscient art is a brick wall in an alley where graffiti artists are constantly spray painting on it. It is in a constant state of evolution. But if the wall is isolated from people then no one adds to it and it begins a natural state of devolution. Things fade, paint flakes off. It devolves from the cusp where evolution ceases to exist. But if five years later the same wall is suddenly opened back up and people begin to paint and tag on once again, at that point it reaches another cusp where devolution ceases and evolution begins again.

Instead of drawing a line that any given piece of art is finished, an artist becomes aware of these cusps and can change any given piece of art over and over again. 

This is Metatranscience. Literally the "science of transition". 

In some ways I see metatranscience as allowing the art to live. When you draw that arbitrary finish line, the art for all practical purposes begins a slow death. You can keep the art alive for a long time using the machines of preservation but eventually, whether its 10 years or 10,000 years, the art will eventually die. 

Why Bother?

By considering metatranscience, you open yourself up to a whole new way to look at your art. Even if you never consciously change your artistic habits, when you begin to look at the lifetime of a piece of art, it cannot help but change your habits. You stop seeing the art as just what is in front of you, but begin to think of ways that the art can last over the years.

I see a whole new variation of art coming from this process. Perhaps we use materials that break down or change over time or subtly change the form of the art. Consider paints that change color over time, or a painting that changes with the humidity in the air or the temperature of the room it is in. The possibilities are endless. 

This is Nothing New

This is the natural state of universe, evolution and devolution existing in all things. But when we become consciously aware of the process and how we as artists can speed it up, or slow it down, it gives us a brand new look at our art. Art is no longer stagnant, but just as alive as we are. 

Where Did I Begin?



For me, the journey towards metatranscience began when I created a large piece of art for a show. This was called "The Door to Nowhere". It was made from styrofoam panels and stood 10 feet high and 8 feet across. It was literally a door that you could not open. Upon its surface was iconography from Hurricane Katrina. I'd never had any intentions or misconceptions that a piece of art this large would sell. It was created for effect and statement only. 

When the show (which was a week long) was over, I moved the piece back to my studio and propped it up in my studio alley. I'd figure out what to do with it later. The show was in December and of course other things came and went. The art stood in the alley for months, through winter and into the spring. 

When I next took notice of it, Cats Claw vines had begun to grow up its surface. Rain had washed away a few of the details and the piece had aged. 

I was intrigued, because it had taken on a more realistic look of a door slowly retreating into nature. 

Over the coming months I kept a more constant watch on its progress, just allowing nature to take its course. About that time I began working on the Imaginarium art space. The Door to Nowhere was still sitting there and I decided to incorporate it into the Imaginarium. I moved its pieces, reattached it to frame that was anchored in the ground, and instantly it had found a new home. 



Over time I've added to it, removed from it and had my art interns leave graffiti and art upon it. Today it is no longer the same piece it was when I had it in the show. It is something that has gone through the cusp on multiple occasions and to this day remains a vital part of the Imaginarium. 

This is metatransient art.

Later, other pieces were incorporated into the design of the Imaginarium to the point where the whole space represents metatranscience in its truest form.

Whats Next?

During the past few years, I've explored metatranscience more deeply. Last year we created an internal studio space that began as simply white walls 4 feet wide and 6 feet high, which formed a square made from canvas. Over 6 successive body painting sessions, the walls were changed over and over to reflect the themes of each session. There was continuity from session to session, by leaving some elements unchanged and others partially changed. In simple terms, the walls evolved and were as much a part of each session as the model being painted.

With this in mind, we recently created a 16 square foot space using both the metatranscience and another art concept called Structural Chaos. In the coming weeks we will be doing a series of 6 body paintings within the space. The difference between last years project and this years, is that the space is 3 dimensional. The model will be inserted into the midst of a geometric web while they are being painted and photographed. The web will constantly change, as will the background. 


Where we go after that with the concept is unknown. I'd like to see other artists working within the framework of metatranscience and see it go in other directions. 

One fact is certain. The concept of evolving art is here now and it will change the way some of us see art. We've only scratched the surface of knowing where it can take us. 


Friday, March 19, 2021

Structural Chaos in Art



What is Structural Chaos?


Structural Chaos is uniformity and anarchy existing togetherIt is the bringing together of two dynamically opposed forms into a single piece of art. 

Geometry is about straight and bisecting lines, sharp demarcations of color. Shapes mathematic in their design. 

In opposition, abstract art is about a total lack of geometry where the paint, through its complete lack of form, creates random shapes and impressions that allows the eye to draw images within the chaos. 

The key to Structural Chaos is to work in multiple dimensions. There are artists that utilize both geometry and abstraction within their work, but rarely is it translated into multiple dimensions. Using only one dimension causes the geometry to often get lost within the abstraction. It overwhelms the opposing aspect that is so crucial to structural chaos. 

geometry by its very nature is 3 dimensional. You can portray a box as a 3 dimensional object much more effectively than you can by just drawing it.

To some artists structural chaos will not be anything new. They take it for granted when they create their art. But I feel that understanding the definition of what you are doing helps you to clarify the process and bring out both aspects more clearly.